Sculptures for exhibition

  • Ghost of the Medusa

    The title of this piece is an allusion to Gericault’s masterpiece, The Raft of the Medusa. It addresses the current Syrian refugee crisis. As of 2017, the UN Refugee Agency has registered 4,863,684 refugees displaced from Syria. Hundreds of thousands of whom have fled by sea, seeking a safe harbor from persecution and war. Many of them have perished; casualties of improvised life boats and closed borders. The future of the survivors is still to be determined.
  • Title: Ghost of the Medusa
    Medium: Rubber inner tubes, found wood, canvas, rope, fiberglass, whitewash, marble dust, glass bottles
    Dimensions: 192" x 126” x 72”
  • Title: Ghost of the Medusa
    Medium: Rubber inner tubes, found wood, canvas, rope, fiberglass, whitewash, marble dust, glass bottles
    Dimensions: 192" x 126” x 72”
  • Title: Ghost of the Medusa
    Medium: Rubber inner tubes, found wood, canvas, rope, fiberglass, whitewash, marble dust, glass bottles
    Dimensions: 192” x 126"”x 72”
  • Title: Ghost of the Medusa
    Medium: Rubber inner tubes, found wood, canvas, rope, fiberglass, whitewash, marble dust, glass bottles
    Dimensions: 192” x 126" x 72”
  • Title: Ghost of the Medusa
    Medium: Rubber inner tubes, found wood, canvas, rope, fiberglass, whitewash, marble dust, glass bottles
    Dimensions: 192” x 126" x 72”
  • Biped

    I am thankful for the first fish that crawled out of the sea, unto some nameless estuary, propelled only by blind faith and a pair of proto-lungs. Likewise, I am in awe of the first biped that simply stood up one day and continued the long journey towards sentience on two legs. Both must have been as much acts of imagination as evolution.

    Each of us lives today only by carrying the salt water of our origins with in us.
  • Title: Biped
    Medium: Found oars, resin, lacquer
    Dimensions: 28” x 84” x 36”
  • Title: Biped
    Medium: Found oars, resin, lacquer
    Dimensions: 28"” x 84"” x 36”
  • Polis

    Polis is the Greek word for city-state. The prime unit of western civilization. The foundation of which has been built upon the dichotomy of annihilation and procreation. As a species, we have sticked, stoned and out-reproduced all of the competition. We have erected temples and industrial complexes. We have reached towards the vacuum of outer space. We have retreated to our own private networks and assembled smart machines. Such is evolution.

    Today, we find ourselves bit players in a conflict between two competing constitutional structures: The nation state vs. the corporate state. History has shown us that such paradigm shifts are as inevitable as they are cruel, lurching forward over copious amounts of blood and bones. Yet we, the privileged ones, thrive. Each of us inhabiting a household stacked precariously upon the middens of civilizations that have risen and fallen before us.

    I remain hopeful that we will survive, you and I, and preserve something enduringly human. So, I built this pediment for two.
  • Title: Polis
    Medium: Plaster, found chairs, lacquer
    Dimensions: 192” x 32” x 24”
  • Title: Polis
    Medium: Plaster, found chairs, lacquer
    Dimensions: 192” x 32” x 24”
  • Red Cloud

    This sculpture is named for Red Cloud, a leader of the Oglala Lakota from 1868 to 1909. He led what became known as Red Cloud’s War. This conflict culminated in Fetterman’s Fight, the worst defeat of the US army on the Great Plains until the Battle of Little Big Horn. Afterwards, the US sued for peace. Under the terms of the resulting Treaty of Fort Laramie, the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho bands laid down their arms. The US army agreed to abandon its forts and withdraw from Lakota Territory.  This peace was short lived however, as gold was discovered in the Black Hills. Subsequent lobbying from mining interests led the US army to resume support for white settlement of Lakota lands. Thus, perpetuating an historical pattern of broken promises that continues up until the present day.

    At the time of this writing, hundreds of Red Cloud’s descendants gather at Sacred Stone Camp to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which they fear will contaminate the sole water supply for the Standing Rock Sioux. This exploitation of reservation lands not only presents an environmental hazard, it's also an infringement of tribal sovereignty. The pipeline is a renouncement of the US government’s pledge, codified in law, to act as guarantor of Indian sacred sites.

    Red Cloud was a warrior and activist. He attempted to thread an impossibly narrow needle. That of his tribe’s nearly fatal transition from freedom to confinement. He is quoted as saying in his old age, "They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one--They promised to take our land...and they took it.”

    I made this piece for Festival de la Tierra in Paricutan, Mexico. I think that Red Cloud would find a lot in common with the people of Angahuan, who have always resisted.

    Red Cloud’s fight is not over.
  • Title: Red Cloud
    Medium: Oak, copper, lacquer
    Dimensions: 120" x 60" x 48"
  • Title: Red Cloud
    Medium: Oak, copper, lacquer
    Dimensions: 120" x 60" x 48"
  • Stand in the Column of the Cloud (and the rock will follow)
     
    One cannot traverse Iceland without literally tripping over lava stones. In geological terms, this island is still in its infancy. It is still growing – still creating itself. The ever present lava stones are both substrate and artifact of this creation. So for this exhibition I had determined myself to use this beautiful, ubiquitous material. It was in search of said lava, last summer that I drove by a small mountain, crowned by a single cloud. The cloud was haloed by late afternoon sun. A sign if ever there was one. The title of this piece is an excerpt from the Book of Exodus wherein Moses ascends Mt. Sinai. A cloud simultaneously descends. Upon reaching the summit, it is not a burning bush that he sees first. Rather, he is surrounded by a dense cloud. He can see nothing, yet he is in the place where God dwells. This sculpture is meant to allude to that moment, just prior to revelation, when we find ourselves enveloped in unknowing - In doubt. I think that most of us stand there perpetually. So, I built this lava stone cloud for one.
  • Title: Stand in the Column of the Cloud (And the rock will follow)
    Medium: Lava stones and monofilament
    Dimensions: 120" x 54" x 54"
  • Title: Stand in the Column of the Cloud (And the rock will follow)
    Medium: Lava stones and monofilament
    Dimensions: 120" x 54" x 54"
     
  • Title: Stand in the Column of the Cloud (And the rock will follow)
    Medium: Lava stones and monofilament
    Dimensions: 120" x 54" x 54"
     
  • Title: Stand in the Column of the Cloud (And the rock will follow)
    Medium: Lava stones and monofilament
    Dimensions: 120" x 54" x 54"
     
  • Film by Guðmundur Í Garðinum
  • Title: Revelatory Cloud Study
    Medium: Lava dust, glue, rice paper
    Dimensions: 8.5" x 11"
  • Monument to the Great Auk
     
    The Great Auk was a flightless bird once native to iceland. The last known  Auks lived on Eldey Island just off the Reykjanes Peninsula. In the summer of 1844, a Danish Count, Frederik Raben hired three Iocal guides to row him out to Eldey Island. The island‘s Auk population consisted of a single pair of birds and one egg. The icelanders caught  and strangled them. The egg was cracked during the chase and abandoned to the sea. Count Raben returned to his castle and had his prizes stuffed.  Little has changed in our own age. We remain casual regarding the extinction of the species we ought to steward. This sculpture is a monument to both the Great Auk, and  mankind’s stupidity.
  • Title: Monument to the Great Auk
    Medium: Pigmented concrete
    Dimensions: 96" x 6" x 38"
  • Title: Monument to the Great Auk
    Medium: Pigmented concrete
    Dimensions: 96" x 6" x 38"
     
  • Title: Monument to the Great Auk
    Medium: Pigmented concrete
    Dimensions: 96" x 6" x 38"
  • A Vehicle for Reaching the Northern Lights

    This sculpture is based on the cathedral in Reykjavik, Iceland. A cathedral is the ultimate metaphysical container; an ornate, direct conduit to heaven. The building is depicted here as a rocket ship powered by an iceberg. This strange marriage of objects is meant to represent a Christian model in thought rooted in an older, much more vast, pagan heritage.

    I like Iceland and Iceland likes me.
  • Title: A Vehicle for Reaching the Northern Lights
    Medium: Plaster, bronze, wood, lacquer
    Dimensions: 48" x 36" 28"
  • Title: A Vehicle for Reaching the Northern Lights
    Medium: Plaster, bronze, wood, lacquer
    Dimensions: 48" x 36" 28"
  • Scout (White Man Runs Him)
     
    White Man Runs Him- (c. 1858 – June 2, 1929) was a Crow scout serving with George Armstrong Custer’s 1876 expeditions against the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne that culminated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was one of the few survivors of that encounter. When asked later how he could have betrayed his fellow Native Americans, he answered that donning the blue coat was the only way to remain in the warrior class.

    This sculpture refers to an historical figure attempting to navigate the genocide that marked the settling of the American West. However, the formal pretensions of the piece also mirror the political, economic and environmental pressures that envelop our national landscape today. In aggregate, these conflicts present us with a crisis of values; where in nothing short of our survival may be at stake. Such is history.
  • Title: Scout (White Man Runs Him)
    Medium: Carved Oak
    Dimensions: 12” x 9” x 40”
  • Pieta
     
    This piece is called Pieta. I'm not comparing myself to Michel Angelo. I titled it thus in order to place it within the context of figurative sculpture. What is the difference between the figure and the body? The Renaissance conception of the figure was really a cosmological diagram with the human form at its center. Today, our conception of ourselves is much smaller. The Self emerges as an electrical-chemical machine.

    My intention here was to incorporate the formal vocabulary of everyday objects in order to re-figure the body. At the same time, I was attempting to deconstruct the traditional Christ narrative. The anatomy of Pieta is based on a Ducati Sport bike. It is at once a motorcycle and an abstraction of the female form. It alludes to both the Mother of God and Mary Magdalene. The confluence and conflict of these two icons comprise the dichotomy of western consciousness. Both remain vehicles of the male imagination.
  • Title: Pieta
    Medium: Gypsum cement, fiber glass, graphite
    Dimensions: 48” x 24” x 96”
  • Title: Pieta
    Medium: Gypsum cement, fiber glass, graphite
    Dimensions: 48” x 24” x 96”
  • Title: Pieta
    Medium: Gypsum cement, fiber glass, graphite
    Dimensions: 48” x 24” x 96”
  • Title: Mother's Milk
    Medium: Fiber glass, graphite
    Dimensions: 24" x 12" x 12"
  • Dead Reckoning

    This sculpture is called Dead Reckoning, which is a nautical term for navigating by sight alone. It poses the question: How does one navigate in an age when historically dominant paradigms are being supplanted by the new? I tried to not so much answer, but rather address the inherent instability or anxiety on which this question is posited. And, I tried to do so in the language of classical sculpture. It is simply a statue of a thing on a base.  At the same time, the object is an absurd negation of itself. Classical sculpture is fundamentally the assertion of the vertical. A compulsion, that probably reaches all the way back to pre-history, when we were but a few lonely hominids confronted by the vast horizon of the Savannah. Yet, I deliberately inverted this traditional pretension by making the sculpture totally horizontal. All of the action takes place below the horizon – below the knee actually. A boat that cannot float, its form and function have been sabotaged. Likewise, the ocean on which it “floats” is at once the ocean and not, for it has been parceled into thousands of identical, closed systems. The meaning of each lay only in its relationship to every other.

    There is also a more personal meaning to this sculpture. I made it when my eldest daughter moved to Maine. I was living in San Francisco at the time. So we were as far apart from each other as one can be. I was quite sad. In missing her, I fantasized about building a kayak and finding Louis and Clarke´s mythical Northwest Passage, to paddle over land to see her.
  • Title: Dead Reckoning
    Medium: Spruce, lead, jars, sea water
    Dimensions: 36" x 72" x 240"
  • Title: Dead Reckoning
    Medium: Spruce, lead, jars, sea water
    Dimensions: 36" x 72" x 240"
  • Title: Dead Reckoning
    Medium: Spruce, lead, jars, sea water
    Dimensions: 36" x 72" x 240"
  • A Vehicle for the Historical Figure

    When I was working on this sculpture, I was reading War and Peace. I became addicted to Tolstoy. I read so much Tolstoy that I began to dream in his voice. I dreamed elaborately plotted dreams of ball rooms and battlefields, observed with Tolstoy’s laser guided vision. I soon exhausted Tolstoy’s novels and short stories and moved on to his non-fiction works. Unfortunately, his political philosophy does not stand up to his novelistic skills. According to Tolstoy,history is dictated by singularly monumental figures driven by mysticism,personality and quasi-deterministic forces. What contemporary historians recognize as utter nonsense.

    Simultaneously enamored and disappointed, I made Tolstoy this sculpture. It’s basically a hamster’s wheel, scaled up to accommodate the average person. It can only move forward. Trailing behind it is an over-sized ball point pen that scribes a line on the floor, recording the machine’s path. This piece is a functional monument to hubris and historiography.
  • Title: A Vehicle for the Historical Figure
    Medium: Douglas Fir, graphite, aluminum
    Dimensions: 24" x 96" x 96"
  • Title: A Vehicle for the Historical Figure
    Medium: Douglas fir, graphite, aluminum
    Dimensions: 24" x 96" x 96"
  • One Eye Open, One Eye Closed

    This piece is about falling in love. I made it when I met my wife thinking that I´d build it and we would go rowing in Central Park and have a romantic picnic. The title refers to my wife´s habit of kissing first with her eyes closed. At some point mid kiss, she opens one eye to kind of check me out. Then I say, "Yes you have my full attention!"
  • Title: One Eye Open, One Closed
    Medium: Poly-chromed wood
    Dimensions:192" x 48" x 38"
  • Title: One Eye Open, One Closed
    Medium: Poly-chromed wood
    Dimensions:192" x 48" x 38"
     
  • Title: Auto Erotic Object
    Medium: Dyed Poplar, burlap
    Dimensions: 16" x 26" x 32"
  • Submarine

    This was my first proper sculpture. Made at age 20. It is carved wood, gilded in red gold leaf. I had read Descartes by this time and was very much concerned with the mind/body problem. This dichotomy, be it false or true, remains the foundation of western philosophy. Where do I end and where does the world begin? Is not an easy question. The ability to say, " This is me, and that is not," is what enables us to experience time, space and other creatures. This sculpture is a metaphysical container signifying one. A sarcophagus or a submarine are one and the same; a vessel wherein one may escape one's element and not perish.
  • Title: Submarine
    Medium: Poplar, gold leaf, glass, pigment
    Dimensions: 28" x 24" x 96